"Wading neck deep in a swamp, your revolver is neither use nor ornament until you have had time to clean it" Mary H. Kingsley (1897)

In Hiding

SONY DSC

The rain stops and the sun appears.
But our chickens are skeptics.
They remain under shelter in what’s left of the yard.

Picture taken in our side-yard.

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12 responses

  1. Toffeeapple

    How many chickens have you now?

    August 21, 2013 at 8:25 pm

    • Just the three.
      We started with Sweet, the hen who adopted us then, while I was in New Zealand last year, Robin acquired a further hen (Sour) plus a young rooster (Biryani). After initial fierce hostilities between the two females a pecking order was established and now they all get on fine.
      Sweet remains by far the best layer: producing a beautiful large brown egg almost every day. Sour gets very broody, often sitting on her empty nest for weeks at a time. Biryani is loud and beautiful but still young. He makes all the right noises, and escorts the ladies around the yard from dawn until dusk – though remains clueless as to what he should be doing with his harem.

      August 21, 2013 at 8:53 pm

  2. Your sceptical chickens are American I fancy. Will you be getting one called basmati?

    August 21, 2013 at 9:17 pm

    • Why on earth should they be American? They are from good Kerala stock – indigenous Indian-bred birds from the country which, arguably, gave rise to the chicken!

      Regarding their names, Lucille, whilst I am quite familiar with “sweet and sour chicken”, and have been known to enjoy the occasional chicken biryani, I’ve yet to see chicken basmati on a take-away menu. What exotic bistros you frequent, young lady…

      August 21, 2013 at 9:26 pm

      • Sir, may I pedantically refer you to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_spelling_differences to explain my feeble allusion.
        Tikka and Masala would have been more in keeping with your naming policy I now see but I often serve Chicken basmati as introduced by my Goan grandmother back in the day. It was made with vencatachellum curry powder from the blue tin.

        August 21, 2013 at 11:15 pm

        • Mea culpa…

          It is time for me to acknowledge my own poor spelling, my dwindling recall of the Queen’s English and my utter reliance on the computer’s “spell-check”. Although the latter sometimes offers beautifully whimsical substitutions, this time it corrected my comment into American parlance. I will endeavour to use “sceptics” when the opportunity next arises.

          But as for your late-lamented Goan grandma, all I can do is attribute her fanciful terminology to some dangerously exotic Portuguese influences.

          August 22, 2013 at 10:34 am

    • S. Etole

      My curiosity is overcoming my good sense. I must know why you think the chickens are American.

      August 22, 2013 at 8:49 am

      • Courtesy demands that I must leave the blog-sphere’s very own Lynne Truss to speak for herself!

        August 22, 2013 at 10:37 am

        • S. Etole

          I suspect it is because of the “k” and “c” spelling, or misspelling, depending on one’s place of residence.

          August 22, 2013 at 10:59 am

          • Though it reflects not just a place of residence… but a whole way of living! I should add an emoticon at this juncture – but old-fashion British reserve runs deep…

            August 22, 2013 at 11:36 am

          • That’s it Susan. Now I must go and get a life!

            August 22, 2013 at 1:28 pm

            • Promises… promises…!

              August 22, 2013 at 1:30 pm

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