"Wading neck deep in a swamp, your revolver is neither use nor ornament until you have had time to clean it" Mary H. Kingsley (1897)

Hinduism

Time At The Temple: Part 4

elephants (1 )-2

Parasoled.

Men sit and stand on festal elephants during a temple celebration in Fort Cochin.


Time At The Temple: Part 3

musicians (1 )-2

Temple musicians

Picture taken in Fort Cochin


Not In New Zealand Anymore..

Following Sunday’s café breakfast, we rode straight into a boisterous but very good-natured Hindu procession heading for the temple.
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Picture taken in Palace Road, part of Fort Cochin’s  “Brahmin colony”. 


The Temple On The Plains: Part 2

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We had experienced darshan.

Now the rest of the temple complex was to be explored. 

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Along with its people:

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Come Blow Your Horn!

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I chance upon another festival.

This time the celebration is Hindu, with a full contingent of brass players.

Their lungs are strong,

Their embouchure, impressive!

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Or possibly…


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Serendipity

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Among the many joys of life in India

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Are frequent unsought moments of intense happiness.

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Such as when I briefly pop out to my local shops

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But surprisingly find myself

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In the midst of sheer spectacle:

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One of the myriad Hindu festivals.

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I stumble into the grace and beauty of music, drama, dance and devotion

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When all I had been seeking was hand towels…

Welcome to my Incredible India!

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“Whether we name divine presence synchronicity, serendipity, or graced moment matters little. What matters is the reality that our hearts have been understood. Nothing is as real as a healthy dose of magic which restores our spirits.”

Nancy Long

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We are indebted to the English author Horace Walpole for the word serendipity, which he coined in one of the 3,000 or more letters on which his literary reputation primarily rests. In a letter of January 28, 1754, Walpole says that “this discovery, indeed, is almost of that kind which I call Serendipity, a very expressive word.”

Walpole formed the word on an old name for Sri Lanka, Serendip. He explained that this name was part of the title of “a silly fairy tale, called The Three Princes of Serendip: as their highnesses traveled, they were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of….”

From thefreedictionary.com

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